Development of Theme

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Development of Themes
In Wuthering Heights, Bronte starts descring her setting by saying,”usually a large mansion or remote castle which is dark and foreboding: usually isolated from neighbors” (Bonte). It is obvious that the the dark and isolated environment described at the beginning of the novel foreshadows the gloomy atmosphere found in the rest of the book. Many authors set the tone, setting, or theme by using the first chapter or first few chapters. In The Catcher in the Rye, the opening character that Salinger creates sets thethemes of the story. The beginning of the book sets the story by revealing three major themes; like the loss of innocence, being isolated from society, and the struggles of becoming an adult. The opening of the story introduces the loss in innocence theme. Holden does not want to grow up. The loss of innocence is practically forced upon him by his society. It is clear that Holden’s society is forcing a loss of innocence upon him when he sates: “Most guys at Pencey just talked about having sexual intercourse with girls all the time” (Salinger 37). Here, Holden's innocence is proved by the contrasting experiences of the boys around him. Holden’s differences in actions show that he is not like them and he is still innocent. Holden’s society is forcing him to lose his innocence in order to be like them. If people around Holden are losing his innocence, it is inevitable that he eventually will as well. By introducing this at the beginning of the book, it foreshadows Holden’s struggles in the later chapters. From the very beginning of the novel the theme of isolation is also present. In the first scene of The Catcher in the Rye Holden is alone, isolated from society. It is clear that Holden is isolated when he states: “I remember around abound three o’clock that afternoon I was standing way the hell up on the top of Thomsen Hill, right next to this crazy cannon that was in the Revolutionary War and all. […] because practically the whole...
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