Development of Punishment

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Throughout many years, many attempted to set codes and laws that they felt were for the better of the good. Keeping peace and controlling crime has always been important. But not everyone has gone down the same path. Different theories of how criminals should be punished have changed throughout times. Roman children were taught laws early in life. The Romans had a direct approach, with no police force and no crime investigation. Punishments were to deter others from committing offenses, so a lot of the times the punishment would be brutal. In the 16th century, A.D. Emperor Justinian of Rome was very determined to make his stamp on the justice system. Though he failed in his attempt, with the fall of Rome, the “scales of justice” left a foundation that many used to build and grow on. The Greek were first to give citizens a hands on approach, the ability to prosecute the criminals. The Code of Draco was harsh and gave same sentencing to everyone. The public interest was becoming more important than vengeance. The Middle Ages created large changes in the growth of church in everyday life. Thousands of people died at the hands of Inquisition. Confessions were brought out of the accused by different forms of torture. Punishment was based on the thought to avenge the victim. In the 18th century many of the great philosophers saw threw the error of our ways and contributed greatly to the treatment of criminals. The Classical School of Criminology was founded by Cesare Beccaria. Thoughts were brought about like the fact that to prevent crime was more important than the punishment. The torture of the accused was done away with and suggested as speedy trials. Separations of prisoners by gender, age and level of crimes committed, were also introduced.

The Age of Enlightenment
The European Dream of Progress and Enlightenment...
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