Developing Cultural and Historical Context in to Kill a Mockingbird

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  • Topic: Dewey Decimal Classification, 10, Library classification
  • Pages : 1 (309 words )
  • Download(s) : 274
  • Published : November 11, 2012
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Cultural and Historical Context

Historical -
1. There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County. pg. 3 2. “I’m just trying to tell you the new way they’re teachin’ the first grade, stubborn. It’s the Dewey Decimal System.” pg. 13 3. “Here’s a quarter,” she said to Walter. pg. 14

4. I picked up a football magazine, found a picture of Dixie Howell, showed it to Jem and said, “This looks like you.” pg. 86 5. Mr. Tensaw Jones voted the straight Prohibition ticket. pg. 132

Cultural -
1. The high-school auditorium would be open, there would be a pageant for the grown-ups; apple-bobbing, taffy-pulling, pinning the tail on the donkey for the children. pg. 214 2. She thought it would be adorable if some of the children were costumed to represent the county’s agricultural products: Cecil Jacobs would be dressed up to look like a cow; Agnes Boone would make a lovely butterbean, another child would be a peanut, and on down the line until Mrs. Merriweather’s imagination and the supply of children was exhausted. pg. 215 3. “There’s four kinds of folks in the word. There’s the ordinary kind like us and the neighbors, there’s the kind like the Cunninghams out in the woods, the kind like the Ewells down at the dump, and the Negroes.” pg. 192 4. Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings. pg 1 5. Men’s stiff collars wilted by nine in the morning. Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps, and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum. pg. 3
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