Determinants of Total Factor Productivity

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 72
  • Published : February 7, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
WORKING PAPER 7-11

Federal Planning Bureau
Kunstlaan/Avenue des Arts 47-49, 1000 Brussels
http://www.plan.be

The determinants of industry-level total factor productivity in Belgium
April 2011 

 
Bernadette Biatour, bbi@plan.be, Michel Dumont, dm@plan.be, Chantal Kegels, ck@plan.be   
 
 
Abstract ‐  In  this  Working  Paper  the  impact  of  potential  determinants  of  total  factor  productiv‐ ity,  i.e.  the  part  of  output  that  cannot  be  explained  by  the  quantity  of  production  factors,  is  es‐ timated for Belgium using industry‐level data for the period 1988‐2007.   Abstract ‐ In deze Working Paper wordt de impact van mogelijke determinanten van totale fac‐ torproductiviteit,  d.w.z.  het  gedeelte  van  de  output  dat  niet  verklaard  kan  worden  door  de  ge‐ bruikte  hoeveelheid  van  de  productiefactoren,  geschat  voor  België,  op  basis  van  bedrijfstakge‐ gevens voor de periode 1988‐2007.  

Abstract ‐  Dans  ce  Working  Paper, l’impact  des  déterminants  potentiels de  la productivité  tota‐ le  des  facteurs,  c’est‐à‐dire  de  la  part  de  l’output  qui  ne  peut  pas  être  expliquée  par  la  quantité  de  facteurs  de  production,  est  estimé  pour  la  Belgique  en  utilisant  des  données  sectorielles  cou‐ vrant la période 1988‐2007.  

Jel Classification ‐ C82, D24, F43, O47 
Keywords ‐ Total factor productivity, R&D, human capital, competition   
 
 

With acknowledgement of the source, reproduction of all or part of the publication is authorized, except for commercial  purposes. 
Legal deposit ‐ D/2011/7433/12 
Responsible publisher ‐ Henri Bogaert   

WORKING PAPER 7-11

Executive Summary
The  share  of  the  output  of  a  company,  industry  or  country  that  cannot  be  explained  by  the  amount  of  capital,  labour  and  other  factors  used  for  production  is  called  total  factor  productiv‐ ity  (TFP).  TFP  growth  is  considered  as  a  proxy  for  disembodied  technological  change,  which,  following  the  contributions  to  neoclassical  economic  growth  theory  is  believed  to  be  the  pre‐ dominant  explanation  of  economic  growth  in  developed  countries.  As  total  factor  productivity  is  a  residual,  it  is  likely  to  be  a  biased  indicator  of  technological  efficiency  due  to  measurement  errors,  omitted  variables,  aggregation  and  misspecification.  If  the  heterogeneity  in  efficiency  of  capital  goods  and  workers  is  taken  into  account,  the  TFP  growth  residual  is  often  reduced  dra‐ matically,  even  to  the  extent  that  it  suggests  that  almost  all  technological  change  is  actually  em‐ bodied  in  production  factors  (e.g.  ICT  in  capital  goods)  and  that  there  is  hardly  any  disembod‐ ied  technological  change.  In  this  paper,  we  dwell  on  the  issues  that  make  the  measurement  of  TFP and its interpretation as an indicator of technological efficiency troublesome.   Despite the large list of problems involved in measuring total factor productivity, it is generally  considered  as  a  proxy  of  technological  efficiency  and,  more  in  general,  a  major  determinant  of  welfare.  This  warrants  an  analysis  of  the  factors  that  may  determine  TFP.  Research  and  Devel‐ opment  (R&D)  activities  of  firms,  universities  and  research  institutes  are  generally  considered  as  the  main  determinant.  Not  only  own  R&D  activities  may  affect  innovation  and  productivity  growth,  but  firms  may  also  benefit  from  R&D  performed  by  other  domestic  or  foreign  firms  or  research  organisations.  Empirical  studies  have  shown  the  importance  of  these  so‐called  spill‐ overs  for  TFP  and  provide  an  argument  for  governments  to  stimulate  R&D,  e.g.  through  subsi‐ dies  or  fiscal  support,  as  spillovers  also  imply  that  firms  cannot  fully  appropriate  all  benefits  resulting  from  their  own  R&D  and ...
tracking img