Design

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Swiss Style / International Typographic Style (1950s)

Also known as International Style, the Swiss Style does not simply describe a style of graphic design made in Switzerland. It became famous through the art of very talented Swiss graphic designers, but it emerged in Russia, Germany and Netherlands in the 1920’s. This style in art, architecture and culture became an ‘international’ style after 1950’s and it was produced by artists all around the globe. Despite that, people still refer to it as the Swiss Style or the Swiss Legacy. This progressive, radical movement in graphic design is not concerned with the graphic design in Switzerland, but rather with the new style that had been proposed, attacked and defended in the 1920s in Switzerland. Keen attention to detail, precision, craft skills, system of education and technical training, a high standard of printing as well as a clear refined and inventive lettering and typography laid out a foundation for a new movement that has been exported worldwide in 1960s to become an international style. (Source: www.smashingmagazine.com)

Prominent Designers: – Josef Muller-Brockmann – Ernst Keller – Jan Tschichold – Wim Crouwel – Adrian Frutiger

Asian Graphic Design (1960s)

During the postwar period technological leadership and an awareness of Western social patterns and lifestyles raised philosophic issue of Japanese graphic designers as they sought to maintain national traditions while incorporating international influences. European constructivism is a major resource for the Japanese design movement. However, the systematic organization and strong theoretical foundation of constructivism is tempered by a traditional Japanese inclination toward intuitive problemsolving activity and heritage of simplified form. The postwar miracle of Japan, which rose from the ashes of defeat to become a leader in technology and manufacturing, is paralleled by its emergence as a major center of graphic creativity. The...
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