Desert Biome

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The Desert Biome
Natashia Granger Bio/101

The Desert

The desert is a dry barren area of land; it is in the Southwestern United States or areas of extreme heat and dryness. Deserts characteristically receive less than ten inches of precipitation a year. About one fifth of Earth’s surface is desert. Desert can be hot or cold an example of a hot desert is the Australian and an example of a cold desert is the Gobi in Mongolia. Although rain does not fall very often in the desert, sometimes not for years then there can be a sudden heavy rain that can cause flooding.

Animal and Plants

Although the desert may not seem like a suitable place for animals and plants to live, there are many that are well suited for the environment. Short grass grows nearly in all deserts. Desert plants include the creosote bushes, cacti, the sage brush, saguaro, the popcorn flower, and the fairy duster just to name a few. The cactus is only found in the Sonoran desert of North America and spinifex is found in the Australian desert. Reptiles, insects, birds, and small mammals call the desert home. There are very few large animals that have adapted to the desert, there size makes it difficult to find shelter from the heat and they are not able to store water. Some the animals found in the desert are the Australia’s bilby and kowari, the kangaroo mice of North America, the water-holding frog, and bobcat these are just a few examples of small mammals that live in the desert. One of the few large mammals that have survived and lives in the desert is the camel they have many special adaptations to help them survive.

Structure and function of the main organs in the Camel and the Water-Holding Frog

Two organisms that have survived and adapted to the desert are the camel and the water holding...
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