Descriptive Geometry

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  • Topic: Descriptive geometry, Map projection, Dimension
  • Pages : 3 (905 words )
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  • Published : December 12, 2012
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Ghida Al-Messelmani

Descriptive Geometry

“Drawing is the language of design, and if drawing can be thought of as a language then, descriptive geometry is the grammar of this language.”

Definition:
Descriptive geometry is the branch of geometry which allows the representation of three-dimensional objects in two dimensions, by using a specific set of procedures. The resulting techniques are important for engineering, architecture, design and in art. The theoretical basis for descriptive geometry is provided by planar geometric projections. Gaspard Monge is usually considered the "father of descriptive geometry". He first developed his techniques to solve geometric problems in 1765 while working as a draftsman for military fortifications, and later published his findings. Monge’s protocols allow an imaginary object to be drawn in such a way that it may be 3-D modeled. All geometric aspects of the imaginary object are accounted for in true size/to-scale and shape, and can be imaged as seen from any position in space. All images are represented on a two-dimensional surface. Descriptive geometry uses the image-creating technique of imaginary, parallel projectors emanating from an imaginary object and intersecting an imaginary plane of projection at right angles. INVENTION OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY IN FRANCE

The man who both invented a technique on which all the modern graphical communication is based and initiated a fundamental change in the teaching of such subjects was a French mathematician Gaspard Monge (1746-1818). The background to his understanding of mathematical concepts is largely explicable by the general development of mathematical education in France at the time.

Wolf pointed out:
The pioneers of modern science wished and expected the relations between science and technology to be most intimate. The notion of knowledge for its own sake had no glamour for them. In fact, it was their great expectation that the new sciences, unlike the...
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