Description of a Mechanism

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Description of a Mechanism

Group III

Group Leader:Maureen Bianca Cobilla

Members:Erica Bulloso
Catherine Gayle Cancio
Tina Rose Capuli

B.S in Psychology II-A Table of Contents

1Description of Mechanism. . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . .1
Initial Presentation. . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Organization of the Description. . . . . . . . . . . .2
Part by Part Description. . . . . . . . . . . .3
The Conclusion of Mechanism. . . . . . . . . . . .4
Some Other Problems . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Problems of Precision and Scope . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Suggestion of Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Practicing Organization. . . . . . . . . . . .6
Writing Brief Description. . . . . . . . . . . .6

Description of a mechanism
The principles of the description of a mechanism apply to all types of mechanisms and to static object as well. In general, the technique presented in this chapter applies to the description of things; the technique to be used for the description of actions is presented in the following chapter. The general procedure in describing a mechanism is quite simple; in practice the chief difficulty lies in writing sentences that really say what you want them to say. There is no more fertile field for “boners.” The three fundamental divisions of the description are the introduction, the part-by-part description, and the conclusion. The first is that description of a mechanism almost never constitutes an entire report by itself. The second is that what needs to be said in the description always depends on what the reader needs to know.

The Introduction

Because the description of a mechanism seldom constitutes an article or report by itself, the introduction required is usually rather simple. Nevertheless, it is very important that the introduction be done carefully. The two elements that need most careful attention are (1) the initial presentation of the mechanism, and (2) the organization of the description.

The Initial Presentation

At the beginning of a discussion of an unfamiliar mechanism, a reader immediately needs three kinds of information: (1) what it is, (2) what its purpose is, and (3) what it looks like. The problem of identifying a mechanism for the reader is simply a problem of giving a suitable definition. If the reader is already familiar with the name of the mechanism and knows something about the type of mechanism it is, all you need do is write the differentia. The reader must also know the purpose of the mechanism. Often, an indication of purpose will appear as a natural part of the statement of what the mechanism is. For instance, to say that grains is a harpoon indicates something about its purpose. To take another example, let’s suppose we are writing a description of the Golfer’s Pal Score- Keeper. Here, the purpose is suggested by the name itself. It is frequently desirable, however, to state the purpose of the mechanism explicitly. In writing about the Golfer’s Pal Score- Keeper we might be more certain that its purpose had been made clear by stating tat it is small mechanical device that a golfer can use instead of pencil and paper for recording each stroke and getting a total. The purpose of a mechanism is often clarified by a statement about who uses the device, or about when and where it is used. Finally, when the mechanism is initially presented, the reader needs a clear visual image of it. The most effective way to give a reader a visual image of a mechanism is to present a photograph of it—assuming the thing itself is not available for examination. A drawing would be second best. Our interest, however, is in creating the visual image with words. Photographs and drawings are more effective than words for this purpose, and should be used if possible, but expense, or the need for haste, or the...
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