Dental Caries

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 190
  • Published : April 27, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
 © 2012 Scottish Universities Medical Journal,  Dundee    Published online: May 2012   

Electronically Published SUMJ ‐ 003    Chambers S (2012). Public Health & Dental  Caries in Young Children in Deprived  Communities in Scotland  

Public Health and Dental Caries in Young Children in Deprived  Communities in Scotland   

Stephanie Chambers (Research Fellow, Oral Health and Health Research Programme,  Dental Health Services and Research)   Correspondence to: Stephanie Chambers : s.a.chambers@dundee.ac.uk       

 

 

 

 

 

  ABSTRACT 

Dental  caries  is  the  most  prevalent  disease  worldwide,  and  is  caused  by  a  complex  interaction of tooth susceptibility, nutrition and the oral environment.  In young children it  can have a major impact on their quality of life, and is the main reason why Scottish children  are  admitted  to  hospital.    There  have  been  dramatic  improvements  in  Scottish  children’s  oral health.  This has been enabled through the introduction of Childsmile, the national oral  health  programme  for  Scottish  children.    Nevertheless,  significant  challenges  exist  in  reducing  oral  health  inequalities.  This  paper  calls  for  a  greater  emphasis  on  the  social  determinants  of  health  to  ensure  that  all  Scottish  children  have  the  benefit  of  good  oral  health.    Key Words:  public health; dentistry; oral health 

Introduction 
Dental caries, also known as tooth decay, affects the vast majority of adults and 60‐90% of  children in industrialized countries1.  It has a complex aetiology as demonstrated in figure 12,  which shows that caries occurs under conditions relating to the tooth itself, sugars present  in  food  and  drinks,  and  the  oral  environment.    This  paper  discusses  dental  caries  in  the  Scottish  context,  describing  its  aetiology,  prevalence  rates,  policy,  dental  public  health  programmes and future directions.  Dental  plaque  forms ...
tracking img