Dengue Fever

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  • Topic: Mosquito, Aedes, Dengue fever
  • Pages : 2 (745 words )
  • Download(s) : 175
  • Published : April 14, 2011
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The dengue virus is transmitted to humans via the bite of a mosquito. The principle mosquito species is known as Aedes aegypti. This mosquito is found all over the world, and, throughout time, became adapted to urban environments. For example, the mosquito evolved so as to be capable of living year round in moist storage containers, rather than relying on the seasonal patterns of rainfall. Another species, Aedes albopictus (the "Tiger mosquito"), is widespread throughout Asia. Both mosquitoes are now well established in urban centers. Accordingly, dengue fever is now a disease of urbanized, developed areas, rather than rural, unpopulated regions. The dengue virus is passed to humans exclusively by the bite of mosquito in search of a blood meal. This mode of transmission makes the dengue virus an arbovirus (that is, one that is transmitted by an arthropod). Studies have demonstrated that some species of monkey can harbor the virus. Thus, monkeys may serve as a reservoir of the virus. Mosquitoes who bite the monkey may acquire the virus and subsequently transfer the virus to humans. The disease has been known for centuries. The first reported cases were in 1779-1780, occurring almost simultaneously in Asia, Africa, and North America. Since then, periodic outbreaks of the disease have occurred in all areas of the world where the mosquito resides. In particular, an outbreak that began in Asia after World War II, spread around the world, and has continued to plague southeast Asia even into 2002. As of 2001, dengue fever was the leading cause of hospitalization and death among children in southeast Asia. Beginning in the 1980s, dengue fever began to increase in the Far East and Africa. Outbreaks were not related to economic conditions. For example, Singapore had an outbreak of dengue fever from 1990 to 1994, even after a mosquito control program that had kept the disease at minimal levels for over two decades. The example of Singapore illustrates the importance of an...
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