Definitions of Hrd

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KAYODE OLANIYAN

Analysis of Nadler (1970) definition of HRD.

CONTENTS
Introduction……………………………………………………………………3 Human Resource Development According to Nadler (1970)…………………3 Series of Organised Activities…………………………………4 Done Within a Specific Time Frame…………………………...4 Behavioural Change……………………………………………5 Analysing Nadler (1970) Definition’s with other Authors……………………..6 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………….8 References………………………………………………………………………..9 Bibliography……………………………………………………………………..11 Learning Log for the Past Twelve Months………………………………………12 Developmental Plans for the Next twelve Months………………………………13

INTRODUCTION
The concept of human resource development is seen to have been in existence as far back as 1940s in the early organisation development interventions (Blake, 1995). Over the years, different definitions have been accredited to the term HRD (Human Resource Development), and these definitions were giving based on the perspective, research findings, and the period (years) which the researches were carried out. Human resource development is a field that could not be given a specific or a generally accepted definition, because it is not a phenomenon that could be seen, felt or touched; therefore an attempt to give it definitions by authors, scholars, researchers, tutors or lecturers may vary (Blake, 1995) At some point, human resource development was seen as a professional field, (Gilley and Eggland, 1989), as a body of knowledge (Jacobs, 1990), or even as a field of study and practise (Weinberger, 1998). However, for the purpose of this assignment, the definition of human resource development, as given by Nadler (1970) would be analysed, and it shall be compared with other definitions that has evolved over the years, in order to ascertain if Nadler (1970) definition is still relevant and valid, or otherwise.

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ACCORDING TO NADLER (1970)
Nadler (1970) sees human resource development as different organized activities, done within a specific time frame, which are designed to produce behavioural change. Nadler’s definition has three major components from which the definition could be analysed. And these are: 1. Series of organised activities

2. Done within a specific time Frame
3. Behavioural change

Series of Organised Activities
Firstly, his view as regards human resource development being series of organised activities was supported by McLagan (1989) argument, which states that human resource development incorporates training, career development, and organisational development activities. Swanson (1994) also argued that human resource development is a process of developing and unlocking human abilities and proficiency through organisational development, and training of its staff and development, in order to improve performance. In a more recent over view of what the human resource development activities are, Swanson & Holton (2001), they concluded by stating that human resource development consists of activities that has to do with, training and development, human performance technology, organisational learning, organisational development, management development, technical training, employee development. Hargreaves & Jarvis (1998) identified six different aspects of human resource development, which are the major activities human resource development encompasses. These are organisational development, staff benefits and dealing with interest groups, training and development, job descriptions, staff planning, and recruitment Looking at the above definitions and arguments stated above critically, it is evidenced that more emphasis is laid on various activities such as organisational development, organisational learning, technical training, and staff training. All these activities put together have similarities and could be grouped under Learning, Training, and Development. Based on this, it could be concluded that, that particular aspect of Nadler’s...
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