Definition of Advertising

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ADVERTISING

Definition:

* Advertisement involved printed, written, spoken, political activity to promote image of a particular product, individual person, service or idea.

* Advertising is to “Describe or draw attention to (a product, service, or event) in a public medium in order to promote sales or attendance”

* Advertising is: the act or practice of calling public attention to one's product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers and magazines, over radio or television, on billboards, etc.to get more customers.

* Advertising is the profession of planning, designing, and writing advertisements.

The term advertising generally refers to paid forms of communication that are distributed at the initiative of economic operators (by means of television, radio, newspapers, banners, mail, Internet, etc.) as part of an intentional and systematic effort to affect individual attitudes and choices in relation to the consumption of goods and services. Public Relations

Definitions:
* “Public Relation is a deliberate, planned and sustainable effort to establish and maintain the mutual understanding between an organization and its public.” (This definition is by “British Institute of PR”)

* “Establishment of two way communication to resolve the conflict of interest and the establishment of understanding based on truth, knowledge and full information.” (This definition is by “Pitman”)

* “The management that functions to evaluate the public attitudes identifies the policies of an organization and develops a program of action to earn public understanding and acceptance.” (This definition is by “Denny Griswold.”)

Differences between Advertising and Public Relations
These two industries are very different even though they're commonly confused as being one and the same. The following ten properties just scratch the surface of the many differences between advertising and public relations. 1. Paid Space or Free Coverage

* Advertising:
The Company pays for ad space. You know exactly when that ad will air or be published. * Public Relations:
Your job is to get free publicity for the company. From news conferences to press releases, you're focused on getting free media exposure for the company and its products/services. 2. Creative Control Vs. No Control

* Advertising:
Since you're paying for the space, you have creative control on what goes into that ad. * Public Relations:
You have no control over how the media presents your information, if they decide to use your info at all. They're not obligated to cover your event or publish your press release just because you sent something to them. 3. Shelf Life

* Advertising:
Since you pay for the space, you can run your ads over and over for as long as your budget allows. An ad generally has a longer shelf life than one press release.

* Public Relations:
You only submit a press release about a new product once. You only submit a press release about a news conference once. The PR exposure you receive is only circulated once. An editor won't publish your same press release three or four times in their magazine. 4. Wise Consumers

* Advertising:
Consumers know when they're reading an advertisement they're trying to be sold a product or service.

"The consumer understands that we have paid to present our selling message to him or her, and unfortunately, the consumer often views our selling message very guardedly," Paul Flowers, president of Dallas-based Flowers & Partners, Inc., said. "After all, they know we are trying to sell them."

* Public Relations:
When someone reads a third-party article written about your product or views coverage of your event on TV, they're seeing something you didn't pay for with ad dollars and view it differently than they do paid advertising.

"Where we can generate some sort of third-party...
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