Defined the Three Different Types of Breach of Contract

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Kaplan Higher Education|
Contracts PA- 130
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Assignment #4|

Rosa Salas
1/31/2013
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In Contracts there are many terms used that sometimes may get confusing. Other times it is hard to tell which words mean what and how to use them properly in a sentence; the word condition being one of them. There are so many uses for the word and it may be used as a form to explain more in-depth in a contract, so that there is no confusion, or questions asked in what was meant by in a statement. Conditioned is defined in a contact as a future uncertained event that creates or destroys rights and obligations. A condition is a contact clause that modifies the basic agreements between the parties. Conditions can be complexed as “if you do this…, I’ll do that…”. There are different types of conditions, including implied, express, condition precedent and condition subsequent. It is legal and very common for contracts to have conditions. A condition can modify or rescind a contract. Conditions can also be based on certain action either of the parties themselves or some other outside action. A contract with no condition is “I promise to pay you $2,000 for your car”. A contract with a condition is “I promise to pay you $2,000 for your car, if a mechanic certifies it has no major mechanical problems. How can you tell if a contact has a condition you may ask, well its very simple, if the statements requires action to be taken for the contract to be enforced. An implied contract is one that is not stated in the contract and an expressed contract is one that is stated. A Condition Precedent
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