Decomposing Copper Carbonate

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Decomposing Copper Carbonate
This is an experiment to find out how much CuO (copper oxide) is left and how much CO2 (carbon dioxide) is given off after heating a certain amount of CuCO3 (copper carbonate). The table below shows the results:

Mass Of Crucible (g)| Mass of CuCO3 added (g)| Mass of crucible and copper oxide (g)| Mass of CuO produced (g)| Mass of CO2 given off (g)| 11.53| 0.25| 11.76| 0.23| 0.02|
15.63| 0.50| 15.96| 0.33| 0.17|
11.53| 0.75| 12.03| 0.50| 0.25|
15.63| 1.00| 16.35| 0.72| 0.28|
11.53| 1.25| 12.46| 0.93| 0.68|
I used two crucibles alternately so that I can use one while the other is cooling. The third column is measured after the copper carbonate is heated. I filled in the fourth column by subtracting the mass of the crucible itself from the mass of the crucible and the copper oxide after it is heated, leaving only the mass of copper oxide. The mass of carbon dioxide given off can also be found by subtracting the amount of copper oxide produced from the original mass of copper carbonate. After the experiment, I found that the mass of copper carbonate decreases when it is heated. This happens because, when copper carbonate is heated, it produces carbon dioxide, and as carbon dioxide is a gas, it escapes from the crucible into the surrounding air, therefore causing a decrease in mass. CuCO3 CuO + CO2

If the mass of CuCO3is doubled, the amount of CuO would double as well because the ratio of the equation is 1:1. The table below shows the number of moles of carbon carbonate I started with and the number of moles of copper oxide I ended up with. The RAM of CuCO3 is 124, [64 + 12 + (16 x 3)], and the RAM of CuO is 80, (64+16). Mass of CuCO3 (g)| Number of Moles of CuCO3 (round to 3 dp.)| Mass of CuO (g)| Number of Moles of CuO (round to 3 dp.)| 0.25| 0.002| 0.23| 0.003|

0.50| 0.004| 0.33| 0.004|
0.75| 0.006| 0.50| 0.006|
1.00...
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