Decolonization: Colonialism and People

Topics: Colonialism, United Kingdom, Government Pages: 2 (864 words) Published: September 30, 2012
Decolonization takes place when a settlement overturns the doings of colonial rule. In a sense, it holds true it sense of violence in every decolonization process, similar in context to a revolution. Many countries, many empires and many villages and settlements have undergone this transformation in government and jurisdiction, which usually is followed by a period known a post-colonialism. The causes of decolonization can be in fact a wide variety, ranging from outside interference to simple public riots that result in wide scale rebellions and revolutions. The magnitude of violence produced by decolonization would depend on the reason for it in the first place and also on the government opposition. But in its most usual cases, decolonization is a mildly violent process. Though most decolonizations are violent, the use of violence is not always necessary nor justified because the necessity of violence is based entirely on a colony’s circumstance. Violence usually ensues for because that government’s officials cannot give off a weak sense to those that wish to overthrow them. The idea is the quicker the problem is dealt with, the more time they have to stop it from happening again. Those that start it are usually ones who would like change in how the country or settled area is being cared for or treated. On most occasions, the circumstances of the colonized country can predict the outcome of said procedure. If the circumstances are poor to severe, usually the opposition crushes those who oppose by brute, swift force. If the circumstances are fair to mildly decent, one stands a greater chance in winning a rebellion than usual. Decolonization is a necessarily violent process in most cases, because no leader or ruler would willingly surrender what they own. And neither would the people suffer a fate that they can change by stopping such a leader or ruler. The justification of violence goes opposed to compromise, reaching an agreement between, at most...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Decolonization Essay
  • decolonization Essay
  • Essay about colonialism
  • Essay on Colonialism
  • Essay on Spanish Colonialism on the History of Puerto Rican People
  • The Will of the People Essay
  • People Essay
  • People Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free