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"The Declaration of Independence" by Thomas Jefferson: A look at ...

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"The Declaration of Independence" by Thomas Jefferson: A look at the writing style of Thomas Jefferson

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The End of a Tyranny

"The Declaration of Independence" is one of the most defining works of American history. During the writing of the "Declaration of Independence", the Thirteen American Colonies were very busy deciding whether America should be independent or not. Some of the topics included how Britain treats the American Colonies, and whether the timing is right to depart from the rule of Great Britain. However all of this heated debate all boiled down to one inspirational document which set the course of American history. In "The Declaration of Independence", Thomas Jefferson declares that the American Colonies should abandon King George III because of the king's tyranny toward the Colonies, demolition of the colonies' right to self-rule, and neglect of the colonies needs.

The Kings tyrannical measures regarding the thirteen colonies is one of the most prominent themes in "The Declaration of Independence". Jefferson first starts by stating that "when a long train of abuses and usurpations, begun at a distinguished period and pursuing invariably... it is their right, it is their duty to throw off such government" (338). In this opening preamble Thomas Jefferson explains that the people should not overthrow their government for any minor reason. However when those people are victims of repeated abuse by a tyrannical government, then, says Jefferson, it is the people's duty to overthrow that tyrannical government. Then in the 27 grievances section Jefferson describes another oppression when King George III has "called together legislative bodies at places unusual uncomfortable, and distant from depository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures" (338). King George does not want the Thirteen Colonies to have any power at all. He tries to make the legal process so painfully hard that no one will bother to try and stop him because of all the work that is required to do so. In addition to the trouble...