Debating Sex and Gender and After Identity

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In Debating Sex and Gender and After Identity, Dr. Warnke presents various arguments that demonstrate how sex, gender, and race are all social constructs. Do you agree or disagree with her argument, and why?

Concepts of sex, gender and race in English language have undergone uncountable naturalization and universalities, to a point that they are now considered to have always been present. There are numerous arguments that revolve around the three concepts of human diversity. Dr. Warnke for example argues that the three concepts above are social constructs (Warnke 153). This paper is in the light of Dr Warnke’s argument but rather disagrees with her argument about sex, gender and race as social constructs. A critical analysis of her argument is presented in this paper. My stand here is that I agree with Dr. Warnke that race or ethnicity is a social construct, but I totally disagree with her that sex and gender are social constructs.

To start with, it is important to put forward the difference between sex and gender. The two terms have different meaning and the meaning of each borrows from different theories characteristic of feminist theories. The term sex refers to male or female based on biological features. On the other hand, the term gender denotes men and women as defined by social factors. However the extent to which the society meets its definition for gender is based on diverse and dynamic considerations, such that gender aspects will vary from one society to another (Warnke 156).

Natural or biological treatment characterizes the analysis of these two terms. That is, sex and gender. From gender and sexual studies videos, all persons are categorized to both sex and gender. Also, that is the same case with race or ethnicity. People actually pass as members of a given category. For instance, actors in any given piece of art may take a given character that depicts belonging to a certain race or ethnicity. On the same note, it very hard to come by an actor who will take on the role a different sex or gender different from which he or she is in actual sense. The only time this happens is when such pieces of work are meant to portray transgender motives or situations or in the event that such works need to present a sense of humor.

When such an observation is made, it is important to note that the observation is temporary and therefore does not last for long. The motive by which the observation is made is only confirmed or evidenced with such observed scenario. What this shows is that people or the entire human race will identify itself with a given social organized group; that is, a race or ethnic group, but rarely will the same people practice transgender roles. Therefore, sex and gender fails to be integrated as a social construct as presented by Dr. Warnke. However, race or ethnicity as a social construct is in line with her claims (Warnke 178). To a more analysis of the claims of Dr.Warnke, gender as a social construct may hold true only if she provides enough evidence. Although at many instances gender is more tailored towards being a social construct, Warnke fails to integrate her claim into evidence that properly asserts her claims. As a result, this paper seeks to disagree with her opinion and claims. The integral assumptions and argument in that case elicit doubt and skepticism, and therefore her conclusions about race, sex and gender cannot be upheld.

People are born and integrated into specific social settings, thereby determining their ethnic and racial backgrounds. These people are born either male or female or hermaphrodites by sex and the gender aspect of it sprouts out of the fact that they are male or female. Dr. Warnke argues that it is the society that builds up the gender side of human race and ethnicity, but fails to provide sufficient evidence to this claim. There are varied believes developed by the society based...
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