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Death of a Salesman

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  • April 5, 2005
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Death Of A Salesman

The play "Death Of A Salesman" , the brainchild of Arthur Miller was

transformed and fitted to the movie screen in the year 1986. The play

itself is set in the house of Willy Loman, and tells the melancholy story

of a salesman whom is in deep financial trouble, and the only remedy for

the situation is to commit suicide. In the stage production of this tale,

the specific lighting, set, and musical designs really give the story a

strong undertow of depression. And logically the screen and stage

productions both differ greatly in regards to the mood they set. Moreover

the movie production can do many things that just cannot be done on stage,

with reference to the setting of course. To generalize, the play gives us

a good hard look at the great American Dream failing miserably. However

the combination of both the stage and screen productions accurately

depict the shortcomings of the capitalist society. Death of a Salesman

specifically focuses on four characters, the first being the main

character Willy Loman, his wife Linda, and their two sons Hap and Biff

Loman. As mentioned, the focal point of this play is Willy Loman, a

salesman in his early sixties. Throughout the story we are told the hard

life, emotions and triumphs of Willy the salesman. Early in the play we

learn that he has recently been demoted to working for commission, which

later in the play,(on par with his luck) translates into Willy getting

fired. As the plot unfolds we discover that Willy had a rich brother who

recently died named Ben, whom Willy looked upon with great admiration for

becoming extremely wealthy and the ripe old age of 21. However Willy

also becomes very depressed when Ben leaves, the fact being that he

re-realizes the meagerness of his own life, and that he is still making

payments on all of his possessions. Willy then comprehends that bye the

time his worldly possessions are paid...