Death Penalty

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Death Penalty – Who Will Live And Who Will Die?

Death penalty, also known as “capital punishment”, has existed as long as long as the humans have existed. Anything from selling beer to commit murders has been punishable with death. It is an essential part of the Old Testament, and it says that it is mans responsibility to execute murders. There is death penalty from the age of 18, but some courts want to use it from the age of 16, even though professors and policemen have concluded that it is an ineffective punishment. From the days of slavery in which black people were considered property, through the years of lynching and Jim Crow laws, capital punishment has always been deeply affected by race.

*Conclusions from the study:
Although more Hispanics and African Americans are victims of murder in California, white-victim cases are the ones most likely to end in a death sentence: • Those who kill non-Latino whites are over three times more likely to be sentenced to die as those who kill African-Americans. • Those who kill non-Latino whites are over four times more likely to be sentenced to die as those who kill Latinos. • A person convicted of the same crime is more than three times more likely to be sentenced to die simply because the crime was committed in a predominantly white, rural community rather than a diverse, urban area. *Direct quotation from internet.

Blatant racism is in courtrooms around the USA. A few examples illustrate the intensity of this racism:

• "One of you two is going to hang for this. Since you're the nigger, you're elected." These words were spoken by a Texas police officer to Clarence Brandley, who was charged with the murder of a white high school girl. Brandley was later exonerated in 1990 after ten years on death row.

• In preparing for the penalty phase of an African-American defendant's trial, a white judge in Florida said in open court: "Since the nigger mom and dad are here anyway, why don't we go ahead and do the penalty phase today instead of having to subpoena them back at cost to the state." Anthony Peek was sentenced to death and the sentence was upheld by the Florida Supreme Court in 1986 reviewing his claim of racial bias.

• During the 1997 election campaign for Philadelphia's District Attorney, it was revealed that one of the candidates had produced, as an Assistant D.A., a training video for new prosecutors in which he instructed them about whom to exclude from the jury, noting that "young black women are very bad" on the jury for a prosecutor, and that "blacks from low-income areas are less likely to convict." The training tape also instructed the new recruits on how to hide the racial motivation for their jury strikes.

These examples of racism are actually true. This does happen.

Black Defendants and the Race of the Victims
USA’s foremost researchers on race and capital punishment, law professor David Baldus have conducted a careful analysis of race and the death penalty in Philadelphia which reveals that the odds of receiving a death sentence if you are charged with killing white victims are 4.3 times more than defendants charged with killing African-American victims The conclusion was clear: blacks were being sentenced to death far in excess of other defendants for similar crimes.

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A second study by researchers at St. Mary's University Law School in Texas provides part found out that the key decision makers in death cases around the country are almost exclusively white men. Of the chief District Attorneys in counties using the death penalty in the United States, nearly 98% are white and only 1% are African-American.

These new empirical studies underscore a persistent pattern of racial disparities which has appeared throughout the US over the past twenty years.

The decisions about who lives and who dies are being made along racial lines by a nearly all white group of prosecutors. In individual...
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