Death Penalty

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Through statistics, newspaper articles, internet findings and information from the US General Accounting office today I am going to persist in convincing my target audience that the death penalty is not a part of the correctional system . I will begin with a quote by Richard Dieter, an executive director from the death penalty information center, "The punishment of criminals by society is for the protection of society from punishment. But since such treatment is directed to the criminal rather than the crime, its great object should be his moral regeneration. The state has not discharged its whole duty to the criminal when it has punished him, nor even when it has reformed him. Having raised him up, it has further duty to aid in holding him up." The death penalty is the pole opposite of that approach. Once a person has been executed, there is no more "raising him up," nor "holding him up." This brings us again to my claim that the death penalty is not a part of the correctional system. I would suggest that it is much more a part of the political system. Today I will speak on four points 1) Who receives the death penalty 2) How some are innocent 3) The costs of the death penalty and 4) The victims.

Who receives the death penalty
Many people believe the death penalty is necessary: According to my survey more than 75% of you believe the death penalty is effective and that there are some criminals who are just so terrible, some criminals that are just so dangerous, and some criminals that are just so irredeemable that execution is the only way of dealing with them. Who are the people we subject to capital punishment? Are they really the "worst of the worst"? The evidence does not even remotely support that argument. There are too many murders in this country, but the death penalty is not designed to address that problem. According to Deathpenaltystatistics .org few people who commit murder are ever sentenced to death, and even fewer are executed—less than...
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