Death and Dying with Moyers

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Death and Dying|
What Constitutes a Good Death|

Review of Bill Moyers programs|

What constitutes a good death?
Living with Dying
I found the section with Dr. Bartholeme particularly intriguing and educational. As a doctor for years he not only had to experience a terminal illness, he also lived the healthcare world on the other side. He pointed out in the discussion that he did not feel safe at the hospital as a patient. He also found out how valuable health insurance is a not only for when you are healthy but for the stage at the end. After a grieving period, he came to terms with the discovery of having a terminal illness. It showed how one man's will to spend his remaining life without restrictions as long as possible. He set goals, which he wanted to accomplish before his death, such as getting married. Dr. Bartholeme faced death without taking steps to prolong life. The only time he sought treatment was extremely vital to keep his quality of life. The fact that his wife took care of him throughout the ordeal only made the relationship stronger. She provided him the comfort and love until the end. The medications taken during his dying were prescriptions to provide a level of comfort to keep the quality of life. Dr. Bartholeme’s wife, Pat, had to believe that he suffered a good death with his dying words pledging his love for her. Each death is specific to ones religious beliefs and cultures. The African Americans hold on longest. They want every treatment available to hold on to life. Whites let go with little or no medical technology. Latino’s is in the middle. It is the Latino culture to die at home surrounded by family. Latino families live close to each other and provide all the support and love one could want to feel loved in their last days. Unfortunately, many Americans will have no support system due to broken families. Until recently, people had to deal with the details of death. Today death is more of a business adventure, and is dealt with in a materialistic fashion. All arrangements made from a distance without personal interaction. The healthcare movement is making a change on how we live with dying. Today there is the focus on providing comfort as one is dying. Comfort care is equally valuable as the treatment care. Regardless of which means of treatment with terminal illness, death is inevitable. Personal values, religious beliefs, and cultures, influences the way we chose to die. The one feature that we all will have in common is the final step…Death. A Different Kind of Care

Within this presentation, there is a lot of focus on healthcare. Palliative care is a crucial part of a good death. Palliative care is any form of medical care or treatment that focuses on reducing the pain and symptoms. With palliative care, the goal is to prevent and alleviate pain and to provide a quality of life. Palliative care in Mount Sinai Hospital is not dependent on comfort care but is offered in conjunction with medicinal forms of treatment. In addition to these services, some places offer art therapy to help with emotional and psychological support. Art therapy offers a chance of personal expression; things people are not willing to talk about openly. We have learned how some doctors talk to their terminally ill patients to help them deal with their impending death, which in turn helps to calm their fears. Hospice givers provide support and become like family. Hospice provides human kindness to those without the support of a family. They work ensures patient’s wishes are honored. What do they want? Do they want life support? Do they want a feeding tube? Doctors work closely with patients to make sure they are aware of the stages of illness. Doctors listen to patients to hear their wishes and help them achieve that goal. When patients wishes are to go back home, the doctors help make sure all services are available. Patient's comfort is the most crucial...
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