Deadly Unna Commentary

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 240
  • Published : June 3, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
“Deadly Unna?” Commentary.
Pages 226-228

The passage of writing being deconstructed is taken from Phillip Gwynne’s novel, “Deadly Unna?”, pages 226 to 228, beginning with “The cemetery was surrounded by an old iron fence,...” concluding with “ ‘Average,’ said Clarence.”. This passage from the book plays a vital role in the overall novel, as it shows the reader the life of Nunga’s, for the first time, and how they interact with each other and with Gary ‘Blacky’ Black, a Goonya and how the intimidation of the different race makes Blacky feel unwelcome. It is in this scene that Blacky realizes the unethical racism surrounding him and his lifestyle and how corrupt it has become. It is through Gwynne’s use of descriptive imagery that the reader can feel the emotion of the quiet, beachside cemetery and the peace of the ceremony. And through the first person narrative that the reader can feel the emotions and peace the surrounds Blacky when looking at Dumby Red. This passage provides a very significant view on the relationship between Gary ‘Blacky’ Black and the other Nungas.

The interaction between two races, when their obvious clash can be very conflicting for anybody, even to Blacky. Even though Blacky considers himself a friend of Dumby Red’s and pays his respects to the Nunga’s loss, Gwynne informs the reader of his discomfort through his thoughts in this passage:

“..I could see Tommy and Sid and a few other people I knew from the footy, but I was the only Goonya there. Nobody said anything to me. I was starting to feel conspicuous, self-conscious. Maybe Mum was right after all, it was their business, Nungas; business. Nothing to do with me.” (Deadly Unna? page 226)

As the reader was positioned to feel sympathetic towards Blacky’s uneasiness, Gwynne’s mention of nobody talking to him and his feelings of discomfort only signifies the division between the two races that...
tracking img