Dbq Scramble for Africa

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Thorughout history, many people respond different ways to different things for different reasons. Often times, when change is forced on a group of people they do not look kindly upon it. This would be the case for what the World considers the Scramble for Africa. According to the documents given, European powers gave the illusion of choice to the people and then backed that up with bullets when they resisted. In response the the European Colonization of Africa, the Native people feared the social problems that would face them along with the fear of foreign rule. This caused them to rely heavily on their religious faith and the belief that dying in battle would be better than becoming slaves. Due to the matriarchal set up of African Tribes, women had a larger role in determining their course of action than women in other European Countires had. 

First of all the British give the illusion that African Nations have a choice in having relations with Europe (1,2). After all, the British offer a contract to be signed by African Leaders which implies that Leaders may choose to accept or decline. After being presented with this dilema, most African Nations such as the Ashanti wished to remain independent and to preserve their relations with Europe.The African's felt like they were in control of their own fate due to the false illusion of free choice. The British obviously anticipated this resistance as they later used warfare to control Africa by force. 

Due to the Berlin Conference, the Continent of Africa was being divided (3,8,5). Many felt like they had been saved in previous crises as a result of their god's doing. African Nations believed that they maintained their independence by being protected from the God's and felt invincible against European bullets. This could be attributed to one of the reasons why the African's chose to fight in the face of an almost certain death. Also the Ethiopian victory...
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