David Hume

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2013
Ha Khanh Pham – 1018673; Dang Khoa Nguyen (Nate) – 1021635; Sujoung – 1021091; Bunny Wong -1019507 International College of Management, Sydney
3/28/2013
2013
Ha Khanh Pham – 1018673; Dang Khoa Nguyen (Nate) – 1021635; Sujoung – 1021091; Bunny Wong -1019507 International College of Management, Sydney
3/28/2013

What are the consequences of David Hume's view on induction and self for managers?

What are the consequences of David Hume's view on induction and self for managers?

David Hume was born in Scotland in 1711. He is known as a philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist, especially for advocating empiricism and skepticism. He had strongly influenced in the history of Western philosophy and the Scottish Enlightenment. (David Hume, n.d., para. 3). He is seen as one of the greatest skeptics in the history of philosophy. He believes that human know nothing except their experience, and experience is based on the notion of objective. Moreover, in David Hume point of view, the law of causality cannot be explained and exist, but only experience is used to explain for the happening of something. Hume accepts the premises of Locke and Berkeley (knowledge comes from experience) but wants to rescue science from Empiricism’s unavoidable conclusion: knowledge of the external world is impossible. This essay will first explain the theory of David Hume which is about the Sceptical. Then the consequences of David Hume's view on induction for managers will be also discussed. Lastly, his point of view on self for managers will be argued clearly. David Hume said: “Sceptical doubt both with respect to reason and the senses, is a malady, which can never be radically cured, but must return upon us every moment, however we may chase it away” (Spillance, 2007, p217). David Hume against the existent of innate idea and stated that human could only learn knowledge from what they directly experience. He divided human perception into two aspects: an impression, which is an experience, vivid and compelling, and an idea, which is a later memory of an impression. According to his theory, impressions must occur before ideas can be generated. Specifically, the complex ideas are arrived at from simple ones through association in time, in space, similarity or causation. In other words, experiences of encountering objects prove the objects’ existence and so this leads to the bundle theory. David Hume’s bundle theory emphasizes that an object is only a collection of properties and relations. Therefore, there is no existence of actual objects except the properties of the objects and this creates another notion of “I” does not exist, the body exists as the properties of an object, and the self is just a bundle of sensations. David Hume stresses that when one examines oneself, one comes only upon impression of other things because human can never observe themselves beyond sensations, impressions and feelings. Moreover, if the self does exist, joy, grief, pain and pleasure would be possible to be appeared at the same time. Therefore, there is no self, but only a collection or a bundle of sensations. Furthermore, according to the concepts above, David Hume believes that God does not exist because no one can ever prove that he or she has had any experience with God and even if someone argues it would be impossible to define the properties of the God. David Hume is also on the ground of naturalists’ perspective; David Hume believes that human behavior is caused by human nature and the environment which includes feelings and passions. Examples as human look for food when they are hungry or sleep when they are tired. David Hume’s thinking on causation is linked to the problem of induction. Causation is the term for two events associated together which take place one after another. However, there is no proof and can ever be proved that one event is caused by the...
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