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The use of the supernatural occurs at the beginning of the play, with three witches predicting the fate of Macbeth. This gives the audience a clue to what the future holds for Macbeth. "When the battles lost and won" (Act I, Scene I, l.4) was said by the second witch. It says that every battle is lost by one side and won by another. Macbeth's fate is that he will win the battle, but will lose his time of victory for the battle of his soul.

Throughout Macbeth there exists confusion as to what is real and what imaginary, and, for the most part, it is Macbeth himself who is confronted with these confusions. The question of whether or not the witches are real must be examined in relation to them. The three sisters are also capable of leading people into danger, often resulting in death as we see in the sailor who was never able to sleep (Act 1, Scene 3). The Witches first appear in the very first scene. They play very prophetic roles, where they predict the past and what the future holds for Macbeth. They appear with sounds of thunder and mysteriously disappear or are swallowed up in a mist. When the three witches predict the fate of Macbeth, it gives the audience a very valuable insight into the fate of Macbeth, making their prophecies a very significant precursor. “When the battles lost and won” (Act 1, Scene 1) was said by the second witch, which says that every battle is won by one side and by the other. Therefore, Macbeth’s fate could be seen as him winning one battle, but losing another, and as we see, he loses the battle of his soul
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