Dangerous Fast Food

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Heart disease and obesity have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. How has marketing/advertising contributed to this? What appeal do food ads hold for the average American? The ads make us eat when we are not hungry and eat more than we need to for nourishment. How do they do it? Locate the kinds of appeals food advertisers use to sell their product in the course of your argument. Heart disease and obesity are a growing problem here in the United States as our eating habits decline with the many options we have as food choices. It can be said that marketing and advertising has contributed to this. By examining the marketing tactics put forth by fast food companies, as well as the target audiences and their desires, it can be shown that marketing and advertising do play a direct role in the heart disease and obesity epidemic here in the United States. It’s 5:00PM, you’re stuck in traffic and you just worked an eight-hour day without a lunch break. You pass a set of golden arches, beckoning you to come and dine, give into the temptation of eating or you could choose to continue to sit in traffic and endure a possibly long commute without any sustenance. This scenario is typical and is a big part of marketing for fast food companies. Americans are people that generally are on the go. Most Americans lead a busy life between work and other activities that may interfere with meals. For this reason, fast food is very marketable to Americans. Fast food appeals to the Americans on the go. Fast food is cost effective as well as convenient. Many fast food establishments are close to places of work and schools. Science Daily states, “There are a quarter of a million fast food restaurants in this country. Further study of fast food on public health should be given a priority.” This abundance of unhealthy yet fast eating becomes a day-to-day habit and few seem to consider the health risk associated with fast food.
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