Dancing at Lughnasa

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I'm doing that too, you should use the theme of them being left out of society as a main one and the theme of power structure through out the play, i.e. Kate being the main bread winner etc. Your right the quotes are confusing. Also look into the pagan traditions, the radio is also a large symbol within the play.

Posted 1 year ago # curlypops

member
Joined: Jun '08
Posts: 11

Profile for cultural context we focused on:
*religion vs pagan rituals (i.e. father jack)
*the poverty
*the isolation
*the roles of women
*kate taking on the traditional role of the "man" being the only bread winner..

i dont have a clue what to right for general vision and viewpoint and literary genre..

hope i helped..

Posted 1 year ago # Jon Ryan

preferred member
Joined: Apr '09
Posts: 494

Profile Below are paragraph topics you can use for each comparative genre:

Literary Genre:

What you need to compare: how the stories of your texts are told.

Paragraph topics to do so:

Text type

The first way to tell a story: text type. There are three choices on the syllabus: novel, play or film. Each text will allow a story to be told differently:

1) the novel: the reader will have a lot of leeway here. Even though he/she does not write the story, it will be the reader who will ultimately imagine and visualize it. They will decide what
the characters look like, how things happen, what the place is like where the story takes place etc. This is because the novel is a prose piece of writing, with the result that the action takes place in the reader’s mind.

2) The drama/ play: here the action takes place in front of the audience. The story is told exactly like real life – there are usually few special effects etc: it is as if the reader if simply watching something happen in their life.

3) The film: a film is similar to a play – it takes place in front of us. However, unlike the drama, a film will use special effects to tell its story in a more elaborate way, such as quick shifts to various locations to tell the story in a variety of settings. This would not be as easily accessible or possible with the drama, or the novel, which would have to make much greater efforts to

illustrate even a change in setting, whereas the film can do this effortlessly and instantaneously.

Broad generic differences

A story has to be told in a specific genre(s): this is basically whether a story is told positively, negatively, happily, sadly etc. Some ways to do this are:

1) humorously – is the story funny? It is if there will be a variety of comical moments to tell the story. Comedy films are a good example of this – Anchorman, Adam Sandler films etc – they tell a story, but use humour to do so. A sub-genre of this is dark humour, where texts adopt a humorous/ comical viewpoint to tell stories about negative issues such as death.

2) tragically – is the story tragic? Does it contain sad/negative/bad events which bring about bad results for the characters which cannot be reconciled/ remedied/ repaired? If a story runs along these lines, it is tragic.

3) heartwarming – if a story is fuzzy on the inside it will be heartwarming. People will fall in love at the end. Generally good things will happen to people who deserve this. The story will generally inspire hope and the belief that one gets what they deserve.

Setting

The setting of a text will play a huge role in the telling of a story. It will contribute to how the plot unravels and will have an impact on how the characters can and will act. These are some ways to think of how setting contributes to a story:

1) is the world hierarchical? If so, in the story there will be certain people with more power, or holding all power, which means that other characters must act with this in mind, or in fear of punishment if they break the rules etc. Often characters will have to overcome this hierarchy in the story. 2) is the setting familiar and ordinary? Then the...
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