Cyp Core 3.3

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Alice Bingham

Yvonne

CYP Core 3.3- Understand how to safeguard the well-being of children young people

1.1- Outline the current legislation, guidelines, policies and procedures within own UK Home Nation affecting the safeguarding of children and young people-

Children’s Act 1989 and 2004-
If there are children that are being accommodated by the Local Authority, then this all comes under the Children Act 1989.

There are six beliefs within the Children Act 1989:
* The best place for children to be looked after is within their own homes. * The welfare of the child is the paramount consideration. * Parents should continue to be involved with their children and any legal proceedings that may concern them, and that legal proceedings should be necessary in most instances. * The welfare of children should be promoted by partnership between the family and the Local Authority. * Children should not be removed from their family, or contact terminated, unless it is absolutely necessary to do so. * The child’s needs arising from race, culture, religion and language must be taken into account. http://www.devon.gov.uk- online 03-02-2012

The Children’s Act 1989 is a law that relates to children to provide for the local authority services that provide for children in need and others. The law is there to put in place of the respect of children’s homes, community homes, voluntary homes and voluntary organisations. Fostering, child minding, adoption and day care for young children is related to this law in a way that the Children’s Act 1989 helps in these areas. The Children’s Act 1989 introduced the concept of parental responsibility. This act aimed to ensure that children’s welfare was dominant, whilst working in partnership with the parents/carers. It is there to strengthen the child’s legal position, to give the child legal rights, feelings and wishes. The Children’s Act 1989 was then updated to The Children’s Act 2004 to ensure that children’s lives are further improved, and gives the foundation of ‘Every Child Matters’.

The Act was updated to 2004 because of the Victoria Climbie case in February 2000. As a result the 1989 act was not up to the standard it should have been, children were not looked out for in a way that should have been done by social workers and the local authority. In 1998 Victoria was seven years old when her mum sent her to live with her aunt as she thought it would be a better life for her daughter. In 1999 Victoria’s aunt meets a man called Carl Manning and they both move into his house from the hostel they were living in. Within days of moving into Manning’s house Victoria suffers abuse from the hands of Carl Manning. Soon after Victoria was sent to hospital, but was discharged from there as they believed that the injuries were self inflicted by Victoria herself, picking at scabs and sores. The doctor contacted child protection, and then later on cancelled a home visit because of the hearing on scabies on Victoria. Victoria’s aunt told child protection and the social services that she poured hot water on to herself, and was hurting herself. Carl Manning forced Victoria to sleep in a bin liner in the bath every night at his flat. In 2000 Victoria is rushed to the hospital again suffering from malnutrition and hypothermia. Doctor’s later transfer her to intensive care at another hospital, and on the 25th February 2000 Victoria was declared dead at 3:15 pm. Victoria’s body was examined and they found about 128 injuries and scars.

The Children’s Act 1989 and 2004 link to child protection as the protection of children underpins different sections of the act. Within section 47 the local authority including different agencies like social workers, child protection and SENCO are able to look into and investigate if they feel there are concerns where a child has suffered or suffers from harm. Section 31 and 38 are where the local authority including social workers, child...
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