Cyp 3.1

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Rate and Sequence

1.1- Explain the difference between the sequence and rate of development and why this difference is important? Development is “a continuous process, which begins at conception and continues throughtout life into old age” (stearns et al (2011) page 126). “It is not about physical growth but refers to the process of maturing and developing skills and abilities” (stearns et al (2011) page 126). This is where sequence and rate come into development. The sequence is the pattern or order of something and this will always be the same. For example, babies will roll over before they crawl, children will walk before they can run, and single words are spoken before sentences can be formed. Children usually follow the sequence at similar ages but not always. The rate is the relative speed of progress or change and the rate of development can vary a great deal in individual children. Some children learn to walk at an early age, for some it is much later, some children begin puberty several years before their peers or can be a bit later than them. Sequence and rate are two different terms but are both to do with the development of a child. The difference being that sequence is when and how the development should happen and rate is the speed of the progress of development. They both link together because they have to work together during development stages in a childs life, however it is not just during physical growth/development it also includes communication, intellectual, social, emotional/ behavioural and moral development. Sequence and rate gives parents a little bit of knowledge when things should be happening in their child life while they are still growing and developing.

What does each development mean?
Physical- This is body and physical skills such as growth, balance, co-ordination, gross motor skills (such as climbing, skipping and kicking a ball) and fine motor skills (such as threading, fastening buttons and using a pencil)....
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