Cutting Room Management

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Status of Apparel manufacturing SMES in the NCR Region- Surveys conducted by Methods Apparel Consultancy - The Cutting Room
This is in continuation with the article published in the previous issue which delved into fabric and trim store priorities. In this issue we venture into the cutting room and fabric reconciliation procedures and highlight priorities which can help improve competitiveness and eventually profitability.

The analysis is based upon the survey conducted by the Methods Apparel Consultancy. Ten factories were rated and 300 people were assessed during the surveys in November-December, 2007 commissioned by the Garment Technical Cooperation (GTZ) in association with Okhla Garment and Textile Cluster (OGTC) to analyze current systems and advise ways to improve overall productivity. The survey was done in two parts, the first analyzing the factory and the second evaluating the personnel.

A comprehensive checklist was developed which covered every department and each point on the checklist was awarded a value of 1 to 5 points, 5 being considered an International benchmark. The points awarded were added and a percentage score was calculated. Priorities for improvement for each department were established.

Cutting Department

---- There is gold on your cutting floor.
The Cutting room is one of the most important departments in the factory; it scored a low 48 to 50% during the survey. The staff in many of these departments is not sufficiently fabric conscious. An improvement of 2% - 3% in utilisation efficiency can make a huge difference to bottom line profitability. Comprehensive fabric reconciliation is essential; it is disappointing to see that most companies do not include this vital aspect in their controls. Machinery

• Machinery
is
generally
well
maintained. Fusing machines have
proper maintenance schedule in place
but regular temperature checks are
not done. Many cutting tables are of
poor quality and not properly
maintained. Most laying–up is done by
hand. End cutters are not used as
much as they should be. Pinning tables
were used in only one factory.

© Methods Apparel Consultancy India Pvt Ltd

Layout, Fixtures and Transportation
• The floor layout is poor and work flow
is unsystematic. Fusing machines and
band knife machines are placed in
corners. Storage and transportation is
poor in almost all cutting rooms.
Fabric transportation is manual in
most companies. Storage of work is
improper and under tables are untidy.
Markers
• Marker planning could be improved in
some of the factories and as orders get smaller this becomes a vitally important feature in fabric utilisation and cutting room productivity. The average marker efficiency was seen to be around 85%.

CASE STUDY 1: Fabric consumption in factory XYZ
Order Quantity – 830pcs
The order was broken into 5 markers and they produced
The total fabric required was
Average consumption per garment
We re-did the marker plan and came up with 3 markers.
No of pieces produced
The total fabric required
Average consumption per garment
A saving of 10cms per garment or 9.5% was achieved!


835 pieces.
1496.1 meters
1.79 meters

End loss losses are not well managed and
were seen to be as much as 5-7 cms in
some cases. The table length is often
underutilized.



819 pieces
1546.62 meters
1.89 meters

Markers are being made on the
narrowest width resulting in width losses
in excess of 2- 3 cms in many lays. The
utilization of fabric width had a score of
40%. This is mainly due to the fact that
fabric is not separated by width in the
fabric store and hence markers are made
to the minimum width.

© Methods Apparel Consultancy India Pvt Ltd

CASE STUDY 2: Benefit of Fabric Width Utilization in Factory XYZ Style No: ABC
Width variation found in the fabric
147cm to 150 cm.
The marker was made on minimum width
145 cm
The markers were remade on a wider width and this resulted in 2.76% fabric...
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