Curse of the Clicker and Clio

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CREATIVITY OR EFFECTIVENESS??
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The Curse of the Clicker and Clio

By, Milana Jagadeesh (1012029) Brand Management PGSEM 2010 batch

Introduction
How often has it been that we watch a superbly creative or an extremely bizarre advertisement on television that has a high recall value? The only problem here is that we seem to recall the advertisement but are unable to recall the brand associated with this advertisement. In other cases we seem to recall the brand associated with the advertisement but find absolutely no relevance of the advertisement to the brand. In scenarios like these whom are we to blame, the audience who are so engrossed in the advertisement that they fail to recognize the brand or the company that is failing to achieve the desired result even with a creative advertisement. What about scenarios where your brands have a high amount of awareness but have negative association owing to the bizarre and graphic nature of the advertisements? This problem gets all the more exacerbated when the products being advertised are low involvement products like shampoos or chips. When products are getting commoditized, it is essential to have a differentiating g factor about the product that will differentiate it from the rest and one way of doing it is through effective brand communication. In the race to differentiate, advertisers often lose track and deviate and fall prey to the curse of the clicker and the curse of the clio.

Problem Statement
Companies are falling prey to the curse of the clicker and the curse of the clio in an attempt to keep audience glued to their advertisements and secure awards for their communication strategy but are they really creating a differentiating factor through these advertisements especially when products are getting commoditized by the day.

Curse of the clicker
Today every product category is manufactured by thousands of brands and this results in an overwhelming media clutter. The number of advertisements that grace our screen is just mind boggling and it is not humanely possible to remember each and every one of these brands while making a purchase decision. Consumers are no longer interested in advertisements that are aired on TV and make a quick reach to the remote the minute they see an ad break. In such a situation, companies have to churn out ads that will hold the attention of the consumer and ensure they see, register and recognize the brand while making a purchase decision. In the bargain, companies are focusing on ads that rely on eye popping graphics or bizarre themes rather than creating ads that will differentiate their brand from the rest and help the company generate profits through sales. What results in most of the cases is a brand with high recognition and recall value but with negative associations in the minds of the consumers. A classic example of this curse would be the JK White Cement advertisement that shows a young woman coming out a swimming pool. No one could guess that it was an advertisement for Cement until they

saw the JK White Cement logo at the end of the advertisements. This ad was considered distasteful and had absolutely no relevance to the product in any way. It was clearly made to capture the attention of the consumer and prevent them from switching channels. The result was negative brand association or a negative brand image in the minds of the consumers. The brand managed to garner some awareness but in a very sarcastic and distasteful way that is not desired out of an ad campaign.

Another ad that I can quote on similar lines shows an old woman transforming into a dog upon consuming this cotton candy that transforms into a bubble gum in your mouth after saying ‘kisne kaha ki mein insaan hoon’. How many of us can remember the name of the brand associated with the advertisement? At least I couldn’t!! I remembered the ad very well but struggled to recall which bubble gum ad it belonged to. After some research I figured out...
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