Curriculum Revision Using Force Field Analysis

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Revision of a curriculum using force field analysis

1. Assume the role of the newly appointed Dean of the College of Education. Identify the problems you have to face with respect to:

A. Planning -

It is apparent that the College of Education has been working as a closed system for the past 34 years. It has not taken into account any of the economic, political and social factors that beset the country and by doing so it has not adapted to meet the demands of the current situation. By remaining static for so many years, the problem the College faces is manifold. Since educational institutions are social systems, and social systems are open systems, all parts are interdependent and, therefore, affect one another. This is evidenced from the problems facing the College.

There is no shared vision-mission for the College.
The College has no vision-mission and, by having none, has no purpose or direction, therefore no preferred future. There must be a vision because it clearly states the why we, as a College exist and what we believe in. It will serve as a statement of our values. It will reflect our philosophy and knowledge, and guide the actions of all those involved. It will direct the organization, as well as all of its major functions and operations, to its best opportunities and is a key component to the next stage of planning for the College, the strategic plan.

There is no strategic plan for the College.
The first and most immediate problem that I will have to deal with is the development of a strategic plan based on the vision-mission of the College. At present, all existing plans are only consolidated plans developed by the faculty “based on what they know is best for the College.” The probability that these plans are biased and outdated is very high since they are not based on any environmental scan, both internal and external. I consider this to be the most important because, for the College to survive, the change it must undergo must be a planned one. In addition, the restructuring of all key areas of the College from its faculty and staff, its goals and objectives, its curriculum, programs and activities, policies, procedures and rules, facilities and budgets, etc. will be dependent on the thrust of this plan. Therefore, all aspects of the plan must be well calculated and based on actual data, not on personal assumptions and prejudices of the faculty.

In the development of the strategic plan, the following problems must be addressed and objectives must be developed to eliminate them or at the very least, bring them under control.

1. Problem: Aging faculty
The current faculty members are highly qualified and committed. Almost all of them have been with the College for 20 years. However, more than half of them are due for retirement. New faculty will have to be recruited and those with a Masters degree have to move towards obtaining their PhDs. There is currently no faculty development program in the College although there are connections with other educational institutions abroad that can be tapped for this need. In addition, majority of the faculty work is in support services rather than teaching due to higher financial rewards that can be obtained through this service.

2. Problem: Old curriculum
The curriculum and programs of the College have not been revised or updated for many years. Some courses may already be obsolete. No feasibility studies have been done to look into possibility of introducing new courses and programs that are relevant to the needs of the country. This problem probably stems from the fact stated above that the majority of the faculty have concentrated their efforts on support services rather than teaching. There is also a lack of young faculty who can infuse new ideas into the system, thereby influencing the quality and significance of the current curriculum.

3. Problem: Low...
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