Curriculum Design

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Curriculum Design for Inclusive Practice

Postgraduate Diploma (PCET) Year Two

Michael Dickinson, November 2011
ContentsPage
Introduction3
Curriculum3
Curriculum Design – Influencing Factors4
Curriculum Design – Linear, Spiral, Thematic6
Curriculum Design – Ideologies and Models 8
Curriculum – Inclusive?10
Conclusion12
Bibliography14

Introduction
This assignment will analyse the Business Improvement Techniques NVQ Level 2’s curriculum. It will consider its design and the ideologies and models it uses and those that it could use to improve on it, if applicable. The Business Improvement Techniques NVQ is delivered onsite at the customer’s premises, in the learner’s environment. Although the underpinning knowledge takes place in a classroom environment, the majority of the curriculum’s needs are met through the activities on the shop floor. The curriculum focuses on increasing the learner’s skills and preparing them to deliver improvements in their workplace whilst being a team player. The typical learner has literacy and numeracy skills around level 1 and can be any age between 19 and 65. The learners complete an initial assessment to identify if any additional support is required to help them meet the curriculum requirements. Curriculum

Before the Business Improvements Techniques NVQ curriculum can be analysed, it is important to define what curriculum actually means. There are many definitions of curriculum and as the educational market is so wide and varied, I have not come across a definition that fits the whole of the market. Daresh (p.272, 2007) discusses what teachers and schools choose to do with children in their encounters. Surely the teacher’s or schools actions are inspired by the curriculum and end result is what is required to meet the learner’s needs and thus achieve the outcomes. Tanner (p.13, 1980) has a good definition as he mentions planned and guided learning experiences although I feel the term ‘systematic reconstruction of knowledge and experience’ implies very little new knowledge is obtained and it fails to reflect on the hidden curriculum. For the Business Improvement Techniques NVQ curriculum, there is much hidden curriculum that occurs and thus it is a reflection on the complete experience that the learner has (Hass, 1987, p.5). This definition is well suited to my speciality area however I would take this further and not only include the hidden curriculum but also emphasise the important role the learner has when they take the initiative and conduct extra activities that enhance their learning experience. This sort of activity is not directly related to the curriculum, the hidden curriculum or the teacher’s influence. It is the ‘in-direct’ curriculum. It is also important to point out the Business Improvement Techniques NVQ curriculum is very fluid and is not a static process. Although the curriculum standards are the same for every learner, there are options in the curriculum that can be chosen to suit the learner and the environment to which they work in. This flexibility in the curriculum is a benefit that well appreciated and utilised with the learners. Curriculum design – Influencing Factors

There are many direct and indirect factors that have impacted on the Business Improvement Techniques NVQ’s curriculum. The Business Improvement Techniques NVQ is based on Lean Manufacturing Techniques. This has a history as far back as the 1450’s although the biggest recognised influences into the techniques are associated with the likes of Henry Ford and Toyota. The main principles are still the same although they have been refined and continue to be refined every year. Henry Ford was driven by the desire to reduce the cost of the product to make it affordable. Toyota was driven out of necessity due to the sanctions put on Japan after the end of WWII. Manufacturing companies are still an influence into the...
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