Curley's Wife

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Curley’s Wife
In Of Mice and Men, the author, John Steinbeck, talks about the character Curley’s wife a lot. Sometimes, Steinbeck includes thoughts denouncing Curley’s wife. He also points out some of her good qualities. Because of this, readers can interpret for themselves if Steinbeck thinks highly of her, or if he does not like her. However, while he may go back and forth on Curley’s wife, in the end, Steinbeck is mainly condemning her.

John Steinbeck points out many flaws in Curley’s wife. For example, he does this when he writes, “she leaned against the door frame so that her body was thrown forward” (Steinbeck 51). In this statement, Steinbeck is pointing out that Curley’s wife always tries to instigate something. He also describes her body image and how provocative she is, always looking for attention. Steinbeck says many more things to condemn Curley’s wife, but that is not all that he says about her.

Steinbeck also defends Curley’s wife. He writes of how lonely she is, and describes her as innocent as the rabbits and puppy killed by another character, Lennie. For instance, Curley’s wife says, “Think I don’t want to talk to somebody ever’ once in a while? Think I like to stick in that house alla time?”(Steinbeck 77). In this statement, Curley’s wife implies that she is tired of being lonely and wants to talk to other people. As much as Steinbeck appears to flip-flop on his view of Curley’s wife, readers can draw different conclusions.

However, Steinbeck is trying to display Curley’s wife as bad. The reasons that Steinbeck gives for her being bad outnumber those he gives to condone her. She gets Lennie, a likeable character, into lots of trouble. Steinbeck also writes, “She stood still in the doorway, smiling a little at them, rubbing the nails of one hand with the thumb and forefinger of another. And her eyes traveled from one face to another” (Steinbeck 77). With this statement and others, Steinbeck always comes back to how...
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