Culture in Negotiation

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This article was downloaded by: [UQ Library] On: 09 September 2011, At: 16:52 Publisher: Psychology Press Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

International Journal of Psychology
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Culture and Negotiation
Jeanne M. Brett Available online: 21 Sep 2010

To cite this article: Jeanne M. Brett (2000): Culture and Negotiation, International Journal of Psychology, 35:2, 97-104 To link to this article:

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Culture and Negotiation
Jeanne M. Brett Northwestern University, Evanston, USA

This article develops a model of how culture affects negotiation processes and outcomes. It begins with a description of negotiation from a Western perspective: confrontational, focused on transactions or the resolution of disputes, evaluated in terms of integrative and distributive outcomes. It proposes that power and information processes are fundamental to negotiations and that one impact of culture on negotiations is through these processes. The cultural value of individualism versus collectivism is linked to goals in negotiation; the cultural value of egalitarianism versus hierarchy is linked to power in negotiation; and the cultural value for high versus low context communication is linked to information sharing in negotiation. The article describes why inter-cultural negotiations pose signi® cant strategic challenges, but concludes that negotiators who are motivated to search for information, and are ¯ exible about how that search is carried out, can reach high-quality negotiated outcomes.

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 Á Á   Cet article presente un modele sur la maniere dont la culture in¯ uence les processus et les resultats d’une negociation. Il commence par une description d’une negociation d’un point de vue occidental: confrontante, centree sur les transactions      Á  ou la resolution de con¯ its, evaluee par le caractere integratif et distributif de l’issue. Il propose que les processus de  pouvoir et d’information sont fondamentaux dans les negociations et que c’est par ces processus que la culture a un impact sur les negociations. La valeur culturelle individualisme-collectivisme est liee aux buts de la negociation; la valeur culturelle       egalitarisme-hie rarchisation est liee au pouvoir dans la negociation; et la valeur culturelle communication contextuelle forte ou faible est liee au partage de l’information dans la negociation. Cet article decrit pourquoi les negociations inter         Á culturelles presentent des de® s strategiques signi® catifs, mais conclut que les negociateurs qui sont motives a chercher Á Á   l’information et qui sont ¯ exibles dans la maniere de la chercher peuvent arriver a obtenir des resultats de grande qualite.

Breakdowns in negotiations when parties...
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