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Cultural Studies

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  • Feb. 1, 2013
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Patricia BurgosHumanities 2
4-Advertising Prof. Castro
“Renaissance Education”
The Renaissance period was a subject for a change in education in the early days. It was a period of new inventions and was drastically different from the Middle Ages. The Renaissance was a period of European history, between 1300 and 1600. Many dramatic changes happened during the this period. During the Middle Ages, the church held most of the power and it's economy was agriculturaly based and exploration and learning was almost put to a stop. During The Renaissance period, society was transformed into a society increasingly dominated by central political institutions with an urban commercial attitude, the emphasis in education of the medieval scholastics was on theology and spiritual pursuits, and man was viewed as inherently unworthy as a result of the stain of original sin. In contrast to that, Renaissance educators revived the study of the classics and stressed the importance of the individualism. Indeed, the ideal Renaissance man was cultured and well versed in the classics, humanities, and moral philosophy. At the beginning of the Renaissance, humanist educators revived the study of the classics and humanities to help students attain salvation. Education during the Renaissance period had varying values, purposes, and topics depending on the culture it thrived on. The value of education was upheld throughout this period due to the raised standards of the “courtier.” In general, most of the education in this time was based around humanists’ ideas, views, and teachings, which had taken over many universities as the standard practice.  Education in the Renaissance branched into two different extremes. The first being humanistic style. The value of education became more and more important as the standards of a “renaissance man” rose. This man had to be learned in the arts, music, philosophy, letters, as well as Greek and Latin writings. Most humanists would look...