Cultural Relativism: Women and the Taliban Rules

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Human rights, Culture, Anthropology
  • Pages : 4 (1232 words )
  • Download(s) : 227
  • Published : October 27, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Cultural Relativism: Women and the Taliban rules
Yohanna Escamilla
National Distance Education University- UNAD


In cultural relativism, moral concepts are legitimate only to the extent that they reflect the habits and attitudes of a given culture. That is, ethical standards are specific to a particular culture, and any cross-cultural comparison is meaningless. What is considered unethical in one culture might be quite acceptable in another, even though the same moral principle is being adhered to (Thomas, 2008, p. 111). Nowadays, women have been an important point for the cultural growing in societies and cultures. In the west societies, women have made a big step toward politic and business areas. Women have fought for equal rights and have managed to perform jobs that were previously only allowed for men. But in the other continent, Afghan Women, specifically Taliban women have been taught that they do not have freedom and control of themselves. Cultural Relativism

According to Thomas (2008), for cultural relativism to hold up as a normative model we must declare that even the most hideous or reprehensible behavior is not objectively wrong but depends on how a culture defines wrong. However, most of us can imagine acts that we cannot defend in terms of variation in cultural practice. This gives rise to so called hypernorms, which reflect principles so fundamental to human existence that they transcend religious, philosophical, or cultural differences. Such is the case of the Taliban’s women and their culture and rights.

“The Taliban announce the imposition of restrictions on women in areas of their domination. These restrictions are considered by the International community in principle to deny Afghan women of their most basic and fundamental human rights, including the right to freedom of association, freedom of expression and employment. Women in Mazar-e- Sharif and elsewhere were ordered trough loudspeakers...
tracking img