Cultural Diversity in the Workplace

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CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. OVERVIEW

2. DIVERSITY IN THE WORLD

3. CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND CULTURAL HERITAGE
4. DEFENSE OR PROMOTION OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY
5. DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE

6. CASE STUDY OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE
7.1. Coca cola company _an example in cultural diversity 7.2. Statement from the coca coal company

7. WORKPLACE ISSUES AND INTERVENTIONS
8.3. Miscommunication
8.4. Cultural bias
8.5. Assimilation
8. BENEFITS OF DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE
9.6. Better decision making and improved problem solving, greater creativity and innovation 9.7. Ability to compete in global markets
9. MAKING DIVERSITY A BUSINESS ADVANTAGE

10. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DIVERSE WORKPLACE SUCCESS
11.8. Managing diversity tools
11.9. Creating the Multicultural Organization
11.10. On the Interpersonal Level

11. IMPLEMENTATION LEGAL FRAMEWORKS

12. CONSEQUENCES OF IGNORING DIVERSITY

13. CONCLUSIONS ABOUT DIVERSITY AND SIMILARITY

14. RECOMMENDATION

15. REFERENCES

OVERVIEW
Managing diversity is defined as "planning and implementing organizational systems and practices to manage people so that the potential advantages of diversity are maximized while its potential disadvantages are minimized," according to Taylor Cox in "Cultural Diversity in Organizations." Cultural diversity is the variety of human societies or cultures in a specific region, or in the world as a whole. (The term is also sometimes used to refer to multiculturalism within an organization. This article does not currently cover that alternative meaning.) There is a general consensus among mainstream anthropologists that humans first emerged in Africa about two million years ago. Since then they have spread throughout the world, successfully adapting to widely differing conditions and to periodic cataclysmic changes in local and global climate. The many separate societies that emerged around the globe differed markedly from each other, and many of these differences persist to this day. As well as the more obvious cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions, there are also significant variations in the way societies organize themselves, in their shared conception of morality, and in the ways they interact with their environment.

DIVERSITY IN THE WORLD
By analogy with biodiversity, which is thought to be essential to the long-term survival of life on earth, it can be argued that cultural diversity may be vital for the long-term survival of humanity; and that the conservation of indigenous cultures may be as important to humankind as the conservation of species and ecosystems is to life in general. The General Conference of UNESCO took this position in 2001, asserting in Article 1 of the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity that "...cultural diversity is as necessary for humankind as biodiversity is for nature] This position is rejected by some people, however, on several grounds. Firstly, like most evolutionary accounts of human nature, the importance of cultural diversity for survival may be an un-testable hypothesis, which can neither be proved nor disproved. Secondly, it can be argued that it is unethical deliberately to conserve "less developed" societies, because this will deny people within those societies the benefits of technological and medical advances enjoyed by those of us in the "developed" world. In the same way it is unethical to promote poverty in underdeveloped nations as cultural diversity it is also unethical to promote all religious practices simply because they contribute to cultural diversity. Particularly, there are some practices that are recognized by the WHO and UN as unethical: Female Genital Mutilation, Sati (burning the widow on the husbands burial pyre), polygamy, child brides, human sacrifice, etc....
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