Cultural Dimensions on Behavior.

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Mark A. Grant
IB: Psychologie HL
Learning Outcome:
Examine the role of two cultural dimensions on behavior. Introduction:
To begin with culture as stated by Matsumoto (2004) is a dynamic system of rules containing attitudes, values, beliefs, norms and behaviors. There are a variety of different ways in which to interpret culture, such as the perception of food or the way in which people in a particular culture dress. This in a sense is the “surface culture” of a specific country; the “deep culture” on the other hand involves the various beliefs, attitudes and values that a culture entails. Now when we further contemplate about culture and the attitudes, beliefs and values that are derived from that particular culture, we may assume that culture in its very core influences the behavior of others. While some may see this as the truth, others such as the prominent psychologist named Kuschel have stated, that culture can by no means be an explanation for the behavior that people emanate Why? Simply because the term culture is to broad a subject to define behavior, we must concentrate upon the cultural aspects and dimensions of a nation, such as the social or environmental setting an individual may find himself in to explain behavior. When we talk about cultural dimensions, we address the perspectives of a particular culture solely based on values and cultural norms. Due to Hofstede we are able to define various cultural settings or situations under five cultural dimensions. Which are Individualism/ Collectivism, Power distance, Uncertainty/ avoidance, Masculinity/ Femininity and Confucian dynamism, these different aspects of dimensions are less or more substantial in some cultures than in others. Now following we will address the influence that the cultural dimensions of Individualism/Collectivism and Masculinity/Femininity have on behavior. Body One:

Study: (Hofstede) - IBM Employee Correlation Study
Context: The Prominent Psychologist (Hofstede)...
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