Cultural Diffusion: Sushi

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  • Topic: Sushi, Vinegar, Japan
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Sylvester Rimando

Geography 2

September 19 2012

Cultural Diffusion: Sushi

Sushi is one example of cultural diffusion in which went on to expand on a global scale from

a native treat of Japan into an international delicacy. To scope out on how sushi became an

international sensation, there are 4 factors that identify the chronicles of its origins and through an

expansion of this treat internationally. These 4 factors are: the hearth (originating from) ,

evolution (how has it changed within over time), process of diffuse (spread out), and areas of

diffuse (either exclusively native or spread out globally).

The hearth of sushi actually originated according to Alex Renton of The Observer in his

February 26, 2006 article on sushi that long ago Southeast Asians uncovered that cooked rice

actually ferments so the fish stored is preserved in this condition. Also, they can pack the fish in

jars of cooked rice that can be edible for up to a year. The modern form of sushi was first

originally a working class street food dish served at a street-food stall in the city of Edo, Japan in

1824. Yohei Hanaya, the stall’s owner shaped vinegar rice with his hands and then added a piece

of raw fish for its convenience value.

According to a July 26, 2011 article of The Guardian , sushi has faced its evolution over time

from when rice vinegar surfaced around 1600 AD so people bring rice to ferment with preserving

raw fish. Within its 2,500 years of evolution, sushi faces its obstacles that as it goes global can

consequently decline of the raw materials since nearly all of the sushi fish are being threatened in

the wild. As the sushi has changed over time, its incarnations will cater to the types of people to

serve. The authentic sushi will end up as a premium delicacy for the rich. Street sushi will gradually include imitation fish that the industry finds this unattractive....
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