Cuban Missile Crisis

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The Cuban Missile Crisis took place in the 1960’s not long after President John F. Kennedy’s failure in the Bay of Pigs. In October of 62’ photographs of Soviet missiles were taken from planes flying over Cuban soil. This put Americans on the edge of their seat, not prepared for another war. Kennedy already looking like a “soft president” states to the public he must take action. In his speech he states seven steps that will be taken. Any of which are not followed peacefully, will be consider an attack on the United States.

JFK used logos, ethos, and pathos in his speech to the American public. He used logos by stating “unmistakable evidence that a series of offensive missile sites are in preparation” (225). Now, the American public knows it is not a fluke, that evidence has been proven correct. To acquire more credibility Kennedy called out the Soviet government when they stated “there is no need for Soviet Government to shift its weapons” which is exactly what they did (227). This proving the Soviet Government is a bunch of liars, and Kennedy has proven correct, makes the public feel more at ease. Kennedy wanted to the people of America to understand where his standing was in this high-stressed situation. He states America is a “…peacefully, and powerful nation…but further action is underway” (230). After stating the seven steps Kennedy reminds the audience he wants peace by saying “for we are a peaceful people who desire to live in peace with all other peoples” (230). Toward the end of his speech Kennedy uses pathos, to show emotional appeal to the Cubans. He reminds them of the common ground Americans and Cubans have “the aspiration for liberty and justice for all” (230). He explains to the Cubans he understands this is not their fight, that the Soviets have brought them into this. He says their new government has caused “an international conspiracy which has turned Cuba against their neighbors and friends” (230). JFK used logos, ethos, and...
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