Crucible: John and Elizabeth

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Lust is as hot as fire, colder than ice and far easier to get lost in than responsibility. In Arthur Miller's The Crucible, John Proctor's feelings toward Abigail Williams venture from those of irresistible lust during their heated affair to those of complete and utter hatred when Abigail infects all of Salem with her immature lies. At the very beginning of the play Proctor finds himself caught in a seductive lust while his wife is ill. During this time he grows particularlly fond of Abigail because she is able to satisfy his sexual needs. When confronted by Elizabeth, Proctor instantly cuts all ties with Abigail, apologizes to his wife whole-heartedly and tells her the truth about his affair. From that tense moment on Proctor begins to leave his feelings for Abigail behind until they are too miniscule to even be felt. However, Abigail had already convinced herself that Proctor loved her and created the scheme that if she eliminates Elizabeth from his life completely he will be only hers to love. Unfortunately for Abigail, Proctor's love for Elizabeth was far more powerful than his lust for her and almost instantly the ounce of affection he felt for Abigail was transformed into pounds of disgust as she concocted and unraveled more and more lies in the courtroom. Proctor's abhor feelings continued to deepen with every lie until he simply could not contain them anymore. He confessed his unforgivable sin in front of the entire court and somehow love struck Abigail still came to the jail in the middle of the night to ask Proctor to run away from Salem with her. After he tells her he will see her soon because they will be reunited in hell, Abigail realizes Proctors true feelings for her and she selfishly leaves him to his pitiful death in Salem.
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