Crt/205 Week 8 Knowledge Check

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Week 8 Knowledge CheckResults
Concepts Moral Theories Mastery 100% Questions

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Legal Reasoning

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Concept: Moral Theories
Concepts Moral Theories Mastery 100% Questions

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1.Which of the following terms refers to a moral theory that focuses mainly on consequences? A. B. C. D. Relativism Deontology Utilitarianism Virtue ethics

Correct! Utilitarianism is based on the principle of maximizing happiness (or any other measure of utility) for the greatest number of people, as well as minimizing unhappiness for the greatest number. The means of achieving this outcome is not as much of an issue as the actual outcome for the utilitarian.

2.Which of the following terms refers to a moral theory that focuses mainly on one’s intentions? A. B. Relativism Virtue ethics

C. D.

Utilitarianism Deontology

Correct! Deontology is also known as "duty theory" because it focuses on ones plans or intentions.

3.Which of the following is the most accurate match between a term and its definition? A. B. C. D. Relativism is a moral theory that focuses mainly on how to be, not on what to do. Virtue ethics is a moral theory that focuses mainly on how to be, not on what to do. Utilitarianism is a moral theory that focuses mainly on how to be, not on what to do. Deontology is a moral theory that focuses mainly on how to be, not on what to do.

Correct! The idea is to focus on developing the most virtuous character, rather than on what to do or not do. It's what you are on the inside that counts.

7.Which moral theory would probably justify the following question:"Should I commit adultery just this once, if no one will ever find out?" A. B. C. D. Utilitarianism Deontology Absolutism Virtue ethics

Correct! Simple utilitarianism, the correct answer, would probably not condemn this action (unless the person thought a secret act of adultery would have harmful effects). Duty theory prohibits it: If you tried to universalize the principle, you'd be saying that there should be no such thing as marriage, which logically makes adultery impossible. Religious absolutism may appeal to a doctrine that prohibits adultery. Virtue theory does not especially lend itself to an answer.

8.Which moral theory would probably justify the following statement:"Sure, we might benefit from expanding Highway 99. But seizing a person’s property against his or her wishes is just wrong. Period." A. B. C. D. Utilitarianism Deontology Religious absolutism Virtue ethics

Correct! Deontology promotes doing what is right and does not support treating people as a means to an end.

9.Which moral theory or framework is based on the belief that actions are right or wrong because of the beliefs of one's culture or group? A. B. C. D. Religious relativism Virtue ethics Aesthetic reasoning Utilitarianism

Correct! The belief in right and wrong often relies on whatever it is the person’s religious culture or society mandates. These views can vary (that is, they are relative) among different religions and cultures.

Concept: Legal Reasoning
Concepts Legal Reasoning Mastery 100% Questions

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4.Which of the following do you think a justification for a law against flag burning would most likely be based on? A. B. C. D. Legal paternalism The harm principle Legal moralism The offense principle

Correct! The idea of destroying a symbolic thing is itself symbolic, and some people might take that personally. People holding to the offense principle assert that what offends them ought to be illegal. It's highly debatable which offensive acts should be outlawed, but the extremes seem clear enough. For example, if you are offended by some someone's haircut, that doesn't seem like an adequate reason to have a law against letting that person go out in public, but if you are offended by someone dumping their garbage on your lawn every...
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