Crossing the Bar

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The meaning of "Crossing the Bar" is about dying and meeting God when you arrive in Heaven. I believe that in the poem the Pilot was capitalized to represent God, and being able to be greeted by him when he dies. In lines eleven and twelve when he says "And may there be no sadness of farewell / When I embark;" you could tell that the speaker was accepting his death, and did not want anyone to be saddened by him leaving. The tone of this poem is sad since the speaker is dying, but it is also a calm tone since the speaker is accepting his death, and moving on. The speaker had no regrets that he spoke of, and knew that his journey was about to end on Earth. In the poem the word bourne was used (13) which meant a destination or a goal, and by using this word showed that the speaker knew that once his time was up he would go to his final destination from Earth to Heaven. The speaker was talking about the end of a day when he said "Sunset and evening star," but was also discussing the end of life at the end of the poem when he said, "When I have crossed the bar." By talking so easily about both shows that he was okay with the fact that he is dying. In the poem a bar was mentioned which separates the land from sea (3-4). The bar could also be the barrier between Earth and Heaven for the speaker.
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