Crooks of Mice and Men

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Analyzing Crooks
In the book Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, Steinbeck uses descriptive language and diction to explain Crook’s room. After reading the two paragraphs explaining Crooks’s room, a reader can infer that Crooks is caring, lonely and informed about his rights. Crooks’s room is described as “a little shed” with many personal possessions.” Furthermore, unlike the other men on the ranch he has books which consist of “a tattered dictionary and a mauled copy of the California civil code for 1905” and medicine for the horses.

The fact that Crooks carries medicine for both him and the horses shows how caring he is, since he seems to care about the horses. Since Crooks has many personal possessions and his own room, a reader can conclude that Crooks is more permanent than the other men on the ranch. Also unlike the other men on the ranch, Crooks owns tattered books. Since they are tattered, it can be inferred that Crooks enjoys reading these books. Reading is a very solitary form of entertainment. Crooks probably reads because he has no one else to keep him entertained. Given that, it can be inferred that he is very informed about his rights as a working class, African American man.

A description of a setting can tell a reader much about its inhabitants. John Steinbeck illustrates many different descriptive settings throughout the course of the story Of Mice and Men. After reading the two paragraphs describing Crooks’s room, a reader can conclude that Crooks is caring, lonely and informed about his rights.
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