Crm for San Francisco’s City Government

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1- How did the DTIS CRM team change the business process for dealing with abandoned vehicles in San Francisco? How did the old business process work, and what kinds of problems arose? Why was it necessary to change the business process before developing new CRM system?

The city of San Francisco Abandon vehicles Detail Unit is a detached set of officers that

handle abandon vehicle complaints after the vehicle has been abandon for 72 hours. Once the

unit receives a complaint of an abandon vehicle, they respond to the scene and mark the

vehicle, advising the owner that the vehicle will be towed if it is not removed in a certain amount

of time. The initial way of conducting business was that the complainant would call the city and

the telephone automatic system would prompt the complainant to navigate through the different

departments until they had reached the Abandon Vehicles Detail Unit. In some cases, the

complainant would be able to speak with a live dispatcher, in other cases, the complainant would

get an answering machine advising them to leave a message stating their compliant. Those citizens that were able to reach a live dispatcher, their complaints were taken and hand written on a log, and assigned to someone from the Abandon Vehicles Unit. The complainant’s that were prompted to leave a message basically left a message not knowing if they had left their complaint on the appropriate answering service of the correct department.

This system really didn’t provide any accountability because there was no way of

tracking complaints and making sure that every compliant was addressed. Another issue

experienced is that on several occasions, they would get multiple complaints about the same

vehicles, which resulted in more than one employee from the unit being sent out to address the

same compliant. They had no system in place that allowed them to share information about

complaints that had already been previously reported.

The DTIS CRM team was tasked with the mission to create a system that would provide a check and balances system to better assist the dispatcher and the officers assigned to this unit. The CRM team conducted a job analysis to get a better understanding of exactly what this department needed in order to conduct their job efficiently. After completing a job analysis and trouble shooting, they were able to create a system called the 311 center. The 311 center is a centralized dispatching center that receives all the city complaints and route each call to its designated department; therefore not only did the newly revamped system benefit the abandon vehicles unit but, it enhanced the customer service of every department within the city. DTIS CRM provided the abandon vehicles unit with the technology and infrastructure that was needed to improve the service delivery.

Reason why it was necessary to change the business processes before developing a new CRM system was because the existing system was not the problem, instead the business processes were. As it’s said in marketing, it costs more to reach out to new clients, than it does to fix a problem/complaint and maintain an already existing client. The same applies to this case, the business processes were not efficiently implemented causing major setbacks to the business and it was better, and most probably cost effective, to fix or restructure them to be able to properly utilize the existing CRM system. By changing the answering machine that recorded callers complaints made it easier for callers to provide information which in terms would facilitate the work for employees and help them offer a proper service enhancing the performance of the business. Once all the right changes on the business have taken effect it is just a matter of adequately using the already in place system and simply adjust it to the newly organized

business processes.

2- Why is CRM particularly...
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