Critique of "Too Much of a Good Thing"

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Critique of "Too Much of a Good Thing"

"Eating too much food is a bad thing (Steam, n.d.)." says Greg Crister in his op-ed essay "Too much of A Good Thing" featured in the Los Angeles Times (July 22, 2001). Crister raises the issue of child obesity as a growing epidemic plaguing America and the world and proposes that in order to fight this crisis the American public needs to stigmatize the idea of overeating. By stigmatizing overeating children will be less likely to overeat, thus having positive a effects and reducing the percentage of children affected by child obesity. Crister proposes a valid solution to the problem; however he does not take into consideration the negative externalities that may occur from such a stigmatization and the complexity of the situation. Crister begins his essay by stating the United Nations, which is set to meet in New York City in the coming month, has declared that Obesity is a growing heath problem of which western countries are especially being plagued. Current data has shown that child obesity had double in many countries throughout the world and in the United States 25 percent of all children less than 19 years are either overweight or obsessed. Heath problems as a result of obesity is costing the health care system so much that HIV/AIDS will appear inexpensive. Families, more specifically Parent, which Crister regards as important variables in tackling this problem, have been influenced by the media and outdated nutritional information which has prevented them from setting strict eating guidelines preventing overeating. He cites that such information propagated by bestselling books as “Fit for Life" by Harvey and Marilyn Diamond that "Where food is concerned, tension is always to avoided." Crister says that such advice has made parents weary of tackling their children's eating habits. Crister explains that no one should be stigmatized for being overweight but stigmatizing unhealthy eating habits could be...
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