Critique of "The Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in College Students"

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 544
  • Published : April 14, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
iPatrick Blankenship
April 6, 2012
Critique 2
Dr. Whited

Critique of “The Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in College
Students: Impact on Academic Performance”

. “Although reported sleep disorders in adults tend to increase with age, they may also occur among college students frequently enough to warrant screening this population.” Dr. Jane Gaultney made this apparent in her article, “The Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in College Students: Impact on Academic Performance.” This was her attempt to examine prevalence of risk for sleep disorders among college students, but she also wanted to explore gender, age, and race as possible factors affecting their grade point averages (1). Though, reports of sleep disorders in college students have far fewer reports of happening than those of individuals much older than them, it is still a mainstreaming problem with students carrying a heavy work load. Students have to understand that loss of sleep equals loss of performance in and outside of the classroom.

Gaultney took part in a case study in which 1,845 college students from a large, southeastern university were the subjects. The reasoning of the students to voluntarily participate in the study was merely extra credit for a psychology. Procedures were nothing more than a questionnaire, the SLEEP-50 by Spoormaker et al, which was properly validated by college students. The study subjects were of a wide variety; 29% being male, 70% caucasion, 17% African American, 5% “other”, 4% Asian, and 4% were Latino students. They also varied in GPA, averaging 2.77, and age, averaging 20.38 years. 46% were first year students, 26% were sophomores, 16% were juniors, and 10% were seniors. And the majority of the students considered themselves “evening” people. (2)

The results of the study found that over 500 of the students, roughly 27%, were at risk for at least one sleep disorder; which include narcolepsy, insomnia, RLS/PLMD, CRD, OSA, and hypersomnia. The study also showed...
tracking img