Critique of Frederick Douglas Book

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Frederick Douglass' narrative is one of the earliest pieces of writing by a slave. His narrative is both accurate and a inspiring portrayal of slave life. Douglass', in addition to being an author, was also well noted for his oratory skills, this helped catapult Douglass' fame as well as his reputation as a great leader, orator and author. The themes in his narrative hit on much larger issues of freedom. It not only speaks of gaining freedom, but also what a person can aspire to despite the odds put against them. Also, throughout Douglass' narrative he appears to live in a solitary life, seemingly living his life alone; however Douglass does have many meaningful interactions that make him who he is and lead to his freedom.

Some of Douglass' interactions were meaningful, but not always pleasant. In his narrative Douglass speaks of a fight he had with his master, Mr. Covey. Douglass. He describes his fight with Covey as a "glorious resurrection." This fight reinvigorated him to achieve his freedom, and also showed him that he did have the power to resist what was seen as an unstoppable custom-slavery.

Douglass made touching points about manhood, Christianity and literacy that helped bring about the freedom for all mankind. He did so in a peaceful and Christian manner that was ideal and repeated in later years by civil rights activist Martin Luther King. Douglass opened the eyes for many both black and white to the shadows and dishonors that slavery cast on all that were involved with it. Through his hard work, dedication, and sacrifice he helped bring an end to slavery.
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