Critical Response to Timothy Egan

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  • Topic: Seattle, Puget Sound, Space Needle
  • Pages : 1 (412 words )
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  • Published : February 15, 2012
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A critical Response to Tim Egan’s “With People.”

In his essay “With people,” Tim Egan briefly explains to the readers about the changes that Seattle had gone through in many years in the past. The essay starts Egan pointing how Seattle is entirely new, and how it has changed its appearance several times in the last century. He argues that the interminable course of remodeling has ended in hills cut in half, river and lake disappeared and tidelands buried. Besides, he claims the city is not completed, “Every wave of tenants wants to remodel” (128). Thus, it is always possible to see new skyscrapers by the month. While on a kayak approaching Seattle, Egan is able to brilliantly describe what he sees coming into Elliot Bay. As he states, “ Elliot Bay is nearly as deep as the space needle is high, a depth of sex hundred feet that hides a half-blind octopus of three hundred pounds which paralyzes its prey with a toxic squirt” (128). It seems to be sample for somebody reading this now, clearly conjures an image of this scene. Then, he begins to give the reader the vision to Seattle's history by telling them about George Vancouver, who was the first to mark Puget Sound into a map. Vancouver, traveling for one month in the spring of 1972 to on inland sea in the North West wrote: “ As we had no reason to imagine this country had ever been indebted for any of its decorations to the hand of man, I could not possibly believe that any uncultivated country had ever been discovered exhibiting so rich a picture.” To Vancouver that place was very beautiful and perfect just as it was. He also tells the reader about a Native American named “Sealth,” who had done huge deeds to develop and improve Seattle into one of the most beautiful city that we know today, and because of him the city was named Seattle. Egan appears to be concerned about how devastating desire of people is causing inestimable impact to the natural passage as he quote George’s words on...
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